FDA-CDC Investigating Lung Illnesses (Vaping)

Both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are working tirelessly to investigate the distressing incidents of severe respiratory illness associated with use of vaping products. The FDA and CDC are working closely with state and local health officials to investigate these incidents as quickly as possible, and we are committed to taking appropriate actions as a clearer picture of the facts emerges.
While the work by federal and state health officials to identify more information about the products used, where they were obtained and what substances they contain is ongoing, the FDA is providing consumers with some information to help protect themselves. For more information. Click here.


Get a one-ring call? Don’t call back.

A while back, we warned you about the “one ring” scam. That’s when you get a phone call from a number you don’t know, and the call stops after just one ring. The scammer is hoping you’ll call back, because it’s really an international toll number and will appear as a charge on your phone bill — with most of the money going to the scammer. Well, the scam is back with a vengeance, and the FCC just issued a new advisory about it. Read the FCC’s advisory for more detail, but the advice from both agencies remains the same if you get one of these calls: For more information click here.




Phishing: Don’t take the bait

Phishing is when someone uses fake emails or texts even phone calls – to get you to share valuable personal information, like account numbers, Social Security numbers, or your login IDs and passwords. Scammers use this information to steal your money, your identity, or both. The FTC’s new infographic, developed with the American Bankers Association Foundation, offers tips to help you recognize the bait, avoid the hook, and report phishing scams. Click here.


FAKE IRS PHONE CALLS

You’ve probably gotten one of these calls: They say it’s the IRS and they’re filing a lawsuit against you for back taxes. They may threaten to arrest or deport you. What do you do? Watch this video to learn more: here



What Extreme Weather Are You at Risk For?

A change in the weather can happen any time of the year and in all parts of the country. Some places have a risk of wildfires while other areas are exposed to hurricanes and flooding. Knowing what to do before, during and after any extreme weather event can help you and your family stay safe. click here to visit Ready.gov


Are You Prepared for Extreme Weather in Your Area?

Are You Prepared for Extreme Weather in Your Area?

Every minute counts during a disaster – plan now so you’re prepared. Know the risks about the different disasters and hazards that could affect you and your family where you live, work, and go to school. Preparedness is a shared responsibility. While government plays a role, there are  important things individuals, organizations, and businesses can do to be ready for the unexpected.

Here are some steps you can take to become better prepared:

  • Download the FEMA App to get alerts and warnings about weather conditions. Receiving timely information about weather conditions or other emergency events can make the difference in knowing when to take action to be safe. The app also provides safety tips about what to do before, during, and after disasters.
  • Create and test a family communications plan. Your family may not be together if a disaster strikes, so it is important to know which types of disasters could affect your area. Know how you’ll contact one another and reconnect if separated. Establish a family meeting place that’s familiar and easy to find.
  • Document and insure your property. When a disaster strikes, having insurance for your home or business property is the best way to ensure you will have the necessary financial resources to help you repair, rebuild, or replace whatever is damaged.
  • Buy insurance that covers the specific risks associated with your region. Look for homeowners or renters insurance that covers damage caused by floods, high winds from tornados and hurricanes, earthquakes, or other concerns.
  • Strengthen your financial preparedness. Collect and secure personal financial, insurance, medical, and other records so you have the documentation needed to start the recovery process without delay. Know your disaster costs.
  • Get trained to help others. Minutes matter in a disaster, and if emergency responders aren’t nearby, you can be the help until more help arrives.
  • Learn how to find volunteer opportunities and donate to survivors. After a disaster strikes, many people want to donate their time, money, or goods. Learn tips on how to avoid scams when you’re searching for a charitable organization to work with, and the best steps to take to support first responders.

National Preparedness Month is coming up in September. The month serves as a reminder that we all must take action to prepare, now and throughout the year, for the types of emergencies that could affect us where we live, work, and also where we visit.

Visit Ready.gov for tools, tips, and resources to help you prepare, including a video on six things to know before a disaster.